Posted by on Apr 24, 2016 in Court Reporting | 0 comments

Court reporting is a job that offers a lot of flexibility, opportunities, and career growth.

In a demanding and highly-valued job such as this, more and more people are being called to take a crack at it. They are afforded more leeway, given more incentives, and allowed more liberties. For instance, any person who graduated from a four-year college course can become a court reporter, and a fresh graduate can apply for the post. They can work from home, formulate a working schedule that would best fit their lifestyle, and experience employment opportunities in more than just courtrooms.

Those who do not have a college degree are not discriminated against. High school graduates can become stenographers or court reporters with little training, while more seasoned employees can also get themselves a more challenging job at courthouses.

Tri-C court reporting and captioning program manager Kelly Moranz said there are not a lot of people who have a personal interest in jobs leaning towards court reporting, noting, “People don’t usually roll out of bed and say they want to be a court reporter.”

According to Stratos Legal, one reason for the lack of interest of people in these jobs is the fact that they are not aware that being a stenographer does not necessarily mean spending your life sitting in court recording live testimony. Other people graduate to taking depositions in law offices, or providing the transcript for closed captioning for live press conferences, television, and sporting events, among others.

The captioning and court reporting program at Cuhayoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio provides certification for students who have completed between 18 months and three years of training, depending on how much they can commit and how badly they want to climb up the court reporting ladder.

Starting salaries for court reporting are between $45,000 and $55,000 a year, with more enthusiastic reporters making as much as $100,000 per year.