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Meet Tristen Park: Survivor of Two Accidents

Posted by on Sep 1, 2017 in Vehicle Accidents | 0 comments

While going about our daily lives, we often do not consider the dangers of doing simple things that are part of our daily routine, like crossing the street. It is hard to imagine being in the hospital for two weeks, unconscious while working toward high school graduation and getting ready for college. Even more unbelievable, after surviving the first accident, you graduate, but you get in another severe accident. Meet Tristen Park, survivor and fighter of two accidents.

Tristen Park was crossing the street in Mount Vernon, Illinois when she was struck by a vehicle. According to The Illinois State University, Park was immediately rushed to Cardinal Glennon Hospital (in St. Louis) and was under deep sedation for almost three weeks. During this time, Park was hooked up to a ventilator system while she was sedated and eventually was taken off of the ventilator when she regained the strength to breathe without machine assistance. Her recovery would take much longer, however, because doctors quickly diagnosed Ms. Park with a traumatic brain injury, which resulted in lost memories, severe headaches, and frequent confusion.

During her recovery, her family and friends rallied around her cause, creating a social media page dedicated to supporting her through the long process of recovering after the accident. Her surrounding community also got behind the cause, with her cheerleading team raising money through the sale of bows and t-shirts, and nearby businesses collected donations from customers and gave a percentage of their sales to the cause.

After months of speech therapy, physical therapy, and occupational assistance, Tristen continued to work on school and participated in cheering. Her ultimate goal was to be admitted to law school and focus on personal injury litigation in order to help others like her who have been injured in an accident. After graduation, however, Ms. Park was again injured in another serious car accident. Against all odds, she was injured while riding in a friend’s car in the passenger seat. The resulting injuries from this second accident included another traumatic brain injury, as well as a broken neck.

Tristan Park did not anticipate getting into these accidents, especially at a pivotal time in her life. Park was focusing on cheer and school work, preparing for graduation and college, and instead found her life turned upside-down by two serious accidents. Her experience with these thoroughly preventable accidents piqued her interest in personal injury law and how personal injury attorneys (like this law firm in Louisville I found) can help the victims of serious accidents recover compensation for their injuries, lost wages, and other damages.

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Dangerous Defects: Child Car Seats

Posted by on Jul 27, 2017 in Personal Injury, Vehicle Accidents | 0 comments

When an accident occurs, ordinary car occupants can be protected by seatbelts, airbags, and other safety measures that can be found in the vehicle. But when it comes to small children, that is not always the case. The children may be small enough to warrant additional protections, such as child car seats.

Child car seats are specifically designed to avoid injuries to their young occupants. This prevention does not just scope accidents, because even simple events like sudden stops can cause injuries to small children in the right conditions.

But there are instances where child car seats are defective, so they fail to do their only job, ultimately leading to their young occupants getting hurt. According to the website of Habush Habush & Rottier S.C. ®, negligent car seat manufacturers may be held liable for selling defective products. But what are these defects anyway?

Restraints that are too tight

Child car seats have restraints to make sure that the young occupant doesn’t go forward or ejected in the event of a collision, similar to a seat belt. But these restraints can be tricky. If they are too tight, it may actually be the cause of the young occupant’s injury, and when an accident does occur, emergency responders may not be able to extract the young occupant immediately.

Restraints that are too loose

If restraints are too tight, they are defective. If restraints are too loose, they can also be considered defective. This means that child car seat restraints should be just right. Go either way and you can already hurt an innocent child. Using a child car seat that has a loose restraint is as effective as using no restraints at all.

Defective adjusters and buckles

Many times, the restraint problems are caused by defective adjusters, or adjusters that cannot be properly adjusted to make the restraints not too tight or too loose. Also, the restraining capability of child car seats does not just rely on the restraints themselves, but also on their complementing components, like the buckles and latches. Even if a child is restrained in the right tightness, it is useless if the buckles and latches don’t work, because the restraints cannot hold their places.

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Limousine Car Accidents

Posted by on Apr 21, 2016 in Personal Injury, Vehicle Accidents | 0 comments

Edgerton, Wisconsin-based limousine company Lyons Limousine and 20-year-old Janesville resident and driver Aaron Nash are being sued by 45-year-old Michael Johnson and 53-year-old Robert Rosa, both of Fitchburg, who are among those injured in a fatal accident that occurred on March 25, 2016 as Nash was driving Johnson, Rosa, 53-year-old Monona resident Terri Schmidt, 59-year-old Monona resident Kevin Schmidt, 61-year-old Verona resident Louis Corning, and 64-year-old Verona resident Donald Corning to Chicago, Illinois’ O’Hare International Airport for a vacation in Mexico.

The lawsuit, which was filed in the Cook County Circuit Court last Thursday, April 14 and which alleges five counts related to personal injuries received from negligence, also identifies Lyons Limousine owner Patrick Lyons and another company Nash works for, Zenith Limousine, as defendants.

The limousine flipped over and killed Terri Schmidt when Nash hit a construction barricade on the Illinois Tollway near Elgin. Police said Nash told them that he was blinded by the sun, causing him to not see the traffic pattern.

According to federal law, a person needs to be at least 21 years old to be allowed to drive commercial vehicles such as limousines. Federal authorities said on Tuesday, April 5 that they had shut down the operations of Lyons Limousine after investigations into the deadly accident uncovered that it was guilty of several violations.

According to the United States Department of Transportation Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, “Lyon Limousine’s use of unqualified and underage drivers with poor driving records, lack of inspection, repair and maintenance records, and complete disregard of the hours-of-service regulations substantially increases the likelihood of death or serious harm to drivers, passengers, and the motoring public if not discontinued immediately”, with Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration spokesman Duane DeBruyne adding, “The immediate aspect is the company is not allowed to operate”.

The website of the Clawson & Staubes, LLC: Injury Group says that since limousines are large vehicles with a wide turn radius, they probably are susceptible to big blind spots. Also, because of its size, limousines have a smaller space or room with which to stop in case its driver followed the vehicle preceding it too closely, or if its driver gets distracted by the phone or the global positioning system; this means limousines are more prone to crash as compared with smaller vehicles, adds the website of Karlin, Fleisher, and Falkenberg.

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