Posted by on Sep 27, 2016 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

Each year, at least 12,000 individuals acquire a spinal cord injury (SCI), adding to the more than 200,000 already suffering from this condition in the U.S.. A spinal injury is a result either of a traumatic or non-traumatic experience. A non-traumatic spinal cord injury can be caused by an infection, disc collapse, inflammation of the spine, cancer, arthritis, or other types of illness; a traumatic spinal cord injury, on the other hand, is a result of a sudden, forceful blow that crushes, fractures or dislocates a region in the vertebral column.

A spinal cord injury is damage or harm to the spinal cord or spinal/vertebral column. Since damage to the spinal cord will cut the communication between the brain and the different parts of the body, affected areas of the body, which no longer receive signals from the brain can, therefore, become paralyzed.

The brain and the spinal cord form the Central Nervous System which, in turn, is made up of nerve segments that are protected by the spinal column/vertebral column (simply called backbone or spine). To cushion and protect the spinal cord’s delicate nerve tissues, the Cerebral Spinal Fluid (CSF) encircles it, keeping it undamaged despite impact; protection is only possible, however, if the impact is not extremely forceful.

The excessive force that a gunshot, a motor vehicle crash, a slip and fall or a sports-related accident causes can be serious enough to cause disability or even death. Injuries resulting to disability can result either to Paraplegia (partial paralysis) or Quadriplegia (total paralysis).

Paraplegia is characterized by loss of function and control on one side of the body. There are certain cases wherein a person suffering from paraplegia remains to have sensation on the paralyzed part of his/her body, In Quadriplegia, on the other hand, the parts of the body that are paralyzed or where functions and control are totally lost depends on the part of the spinal cord that has been injured. This means that the higher the area of the injury, the greater the extent of paralysis

Partial paralysis, which is almost half of all the cases of spinal injuries, may also be a result of medical malpractice or a mistake committed by a professional healthcare provider. As explained by the Cazayoux Ewing Law Firm it is more possible than not, that if anyone is suffering from a spinal injury, ssuch injury was sustained due to someone else’s negligent or reckless acts. Under the law, victims of personal injury ought to be compensated by the person, firm (or whatever entity) that caused such injury. Pursuing legal action against the negligent party is often necessary in seeking compensation.

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